Centrality of the person: mapping cooperation and coordination among the various actors involved

Assumptions

IMPACT was conceived to propose a forward-looking approach to address the exploitation and trafficking of children. The underlying assumption is that structural vulnerability to exploitation and trafficking needs to be redressed in order for anti-trafficking measures to take hold. The guiding hypothesis of IMPACT is that the full implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child into practice would contribute significantly to protecting children at risk and preventing the exploitation of children, including in the context of trafficking. The underlying assumption is that structural vulnerability to exploitation and trafficking needs to be redressed in order for anti-trafficking measures to take hold.

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Objectives

 

The intent of this first session is to underline  that the centrality of the person should be a guiding consideration  for any intervention. In this context ‘centrality’ is conceived as the recognition of the uniqueness of the human being. Therefore, the biographic, cultural and economic elements of the child’s story, and the child’s interaction with each actor represent the conditions able to determine the pertinence and efficacy of the intervention. Once recognised this holistic idea of ‘centrality’, the mandates and roles of the different actors could be reassessed, outlined and synergic operational relations could be further developed.    

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Training activities and agenda outline

 Total time required 4 – 4,5  hours 

A.    Introduction – 20 minutes

Introduction to session agenda, objectives and expectations, along with the presentation of the session assumptions using as background material the information included in the Chapter I of the IMPACT Report 2013. In doing so the facilitator presents a brief, interactive lecture on the centrality of the human beings and the principles behind it, how it could be applied to the national or local situation to enhance cooperation and coordination among the various actors involved.

Read more: Training activities and agenda outline

Further bibliographic references

  • KMOP/Defence for Children Italy (2013), IMPACT Transnational Analysis
  • Roose, R. & De Bie, M. (2008), Children's rights - A challenge for social work, International Social Work 51(1) pp.37-46
  • Willems, J. C.M.  (2007), Developmental and Autonomy Rights of Children Empowering Children, Caregivers and Communities, Intersentia
  • Vandenbroeck, M. & De Bie, M. (2006), Children’s Agency and Educational Norms. A tensed negotiation, Childhood 13(1) pp.127-143
  • Parton, N. (2000), Some Thoughts on the Relationship between Theory and Practice in and for Social Work, British Journal of Social Work, 30(4) pp. 449-463.
  • Ife, J. & Fiske L. (2006), Human Rights and Community Work. Complementary Theories and Practices, International Social Work 49(3) pp. 297-308
  • Ife, J. (2001), Human Rights and Social Work. Towards Rights-Based Practice, Cambridge University Press
  • Hoyle, C. &  Bosworth, M.  (2011), Labelling the Victims of Sex Trafficking: Exploring the Borderland between Rhetoric and Reality,  Social Legal Studies vol. 20 no. 3 313-329
  • Munro, V. E. (2008), Of Rights and Rhetoric: Discourses of Degradation and Exploitation in the Context of Sex Trafficking. Journal of Law and Society, 35: 240–264.

 

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