Assumptions

IMPACT was conceived to propose a forward-looking approach to address the exploitation and trafficking of children. The underlying assumption is that structural vulnerability to exploitation and trafficking needs to be redressed in order for anti-trafficking measures to take hold. The guiding hypothesis of IMPACT is that the full implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child into practice would contribute significantly to protecting children at risk and preventing the exploitation of children, including in the context of trafficking. The underlying assumption is that structural vulnerability to exploitation and trafficking needs to be redressed in order for anti-trafficking measures to take hold.

 IMPACT proposes therefore to complement measures that address situations of exploitation with measures that are targeted at addressing the underlying socio-economic and structural factors that create an environment in which children are vulnerable to exploitation.  Therefore, strengthening the capability of the public administration to implement child rights standards effectively and consistently into child rights practice is considered the key strategy for reducing the risk of exploitation, enhancing children’s resilience and offering stronger protection from exploitation and trafficking.

This approach shall be considered complementary to the traditional anti-trafficking responses, proposing strong partnerships, cooperation and coordination of all the relevant sectors and actors involved. The promotion of human rights standards and their implementation into practice is considered the foundation on which anti-trafficking responses can lead to more sustainable results. It provides an opportunity to leverage the impact of traditional anti-trafficking measures and is expected to render the precious resources invested in this field more effective.

In light of the background, approach and objectives of IMPACT, the project conducted research and consultations across a range of policy sectors reflecting the human rights of the child as afforded under the Convention. The sectors under analysis included health, education, protection, care and accommodation, work and employment, migration, sports and leisure time, and justice. This broad approach reflects the aspiration to work with a holistic understanding of the person and his or her rights and needs, which are considered as inter-related and indivisible. It aimed to promote a child-centered approach to the analysis of policy and practice. The CRC was used to guide the identification of rights and needs and a mapping of the relevant responses in policy and practice.

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